Eclipse

 

From wikipedia:

Eclipse is the third novel in the Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer. It continues the story of 18-year-old Bella Swan and her vampire love, Edward Cullen. Eclipse is preceded by New Moon and followed by Breaking Dawn. The book was released on August 7, 2007 with an initial print run of one million copies,[1] and sold more than 150,000 copies in the first 24 hours alone.[2]

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-27 and you can click the image for a better look.

Breaking Dawn

From wikipedia:

Breaking Dawn is the fourth and final novel in the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer. Divided into three parts, the first and third sections are written from Bella Swan‘s perspective and the second is written from the perspective of Jacob Black. Breaking Dawn was released on August 2, 2008 at midnight release parties in over 4,000 bookstores throughout the US.[1] From its initial print run of 3.7 million copies, 1.3 million were sold in the first 24 hours of the book’s release, setting a record in first-day sales performance for the Hachette Book Group USA.[2]

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-39 and you can click the image for a better look.

The Pillars Of The Earth

From wikipedia:

The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett published in 1989 about the building of a cathedral in the fictional town of Kingsbridge, England. It is set in the middle of the 12th century, primarily during the Anarchy, between the time of the sinking of the White Ship and the murder of Thomas Becket. The book traces the development of Gothic architecture out of the preceding Romanesque architecture and the fortunes of the Kingsbridge priory against the backdrop of actual historical events of the time.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-18 and you can click the image for a better look.

 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

 

From wikipedia:

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final of the Harry Potter novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The book was released on 21 July 2007 by Bloomsbury Publishing in the United Kingdom, in the United States by Scholastic, and in Canada by Raincoast Books, ending the series that began in 1997 with the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. The novel chronicles the events directly following Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and the final confrontation between the wizards Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-36 and you can click the image for a better look.

 

The hobbit

From wikipedia:

The Hobbit, or There and Back Again, better known by its abbreviated title The Hobbit, is a fantasy novel and children’s book by J. R. R. Tolkien. It was published on 21 September 1937 to wide critical acclaim, being nominated for the Carnegie Medal and awarded a prize from the New York Herald Tribune for best juvenile fiction. The book remains popular and is recognized as a classic in children’s literature.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-19 and you can click the image for a better look.

Lord of the Flies

From wikipedia:

Lord of the Flies is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about a group of British schoolboys stuck on a deserted island who try to govern themselves, with disastrous results. Its stances on the already controversial subjects of human nature and individual welfare versus the common good earned it position 68 on the American Library Association’s list of the 100 most frequently challenged books of 1990–1999.[1] In 2005, the novel was chosen by Time magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005[2] and was awarded a place on both lists of Modern Library 100 Best Novels, reaching #41 on the editor’s list, and #25 on the reader’s list.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-12 (big change from last post) and you can click the image for a better look.

Bleak House

From wikipedia:

Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in twenty monthly installments between March 1852 and September 1853. It is held to be one of Dickens’s finest novels, containing one of the most vast, complex and engaging arrays of minor characters and sub-plots in his entire canon. The story is told partly by the novel’s heroine, Esther Summerson, and partly by an omniscient narrator. Memorable characters include the menacing lawyer Tulkinghorn, the friendly, but depressive John Jarndyce, and the childish and disingenuous Harold Skimpole, as well as the likeable but imprudent Richard Carstone.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-67 and you can click the image for a better look of this, frankly massive dendrogram.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

 

From wikipedia:

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling, published on 8 July 2000. The book attracted additional attention because of a pre-publication warning from J. K. Rowling that one of the characters would be murdered in the book.[citation needed] 3 million copies of the book were sold over the first weekend in the US alone.[1]

The novel won a Hugo Award in 2001;[2] it was the only Harry Potter novel to do so. The book was made into a film, which was released worldwide on 18 November 2005.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-37 and you can click the image for a better look.

Nineteen Eighty-Four

 

From wikipedia:

Nineteen Eighty-Four (sometimes written 1984) is a 1949 novel that reflects a dystopia by George Orwell about an oligarchical, collectivist society. Life in the Oceanian province of Airstrip One is a world of perpetual war, pervasive government surveillance, and incessant public mind control. The individual is always subordinated to the state, and it is in part this philosophy which allows the Party to manipulate and control humanity. In the Ministry of Truth, protagonist Winston Smith is a civil servant responsible for perpetuating the Party’s propaganda by revising historical records to render the Party omniscient and always correct, yet his meagre existence disillusions him to the point of seeking rebellion against Big Brother, eventually leading to his arrest, torture, and reconversion.

As literary political fiction, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a classic novel of the social science fiction subgenre. Since its publication in 1949, many of its terms and concepts, such as Big Brother, doublethink, thoughtcrime, Newspeak, and Memory hole, have become contemporary vernacular. In addition, the novel popularized the adjective Orwellian, which refers to lies, surveillance, or manipulation of the past in the service of a totalitarian agenda.

There are 23 Chapters, but that are named with roman numerals and subdivided into a number of different parts.

1 Chapter I
2 Chapter II
3 Chapter III
4 Chapter IV
5 Chapter V
6 Chapter VI
7 Chapter VII
8 Chapter VIII
9 Chapter I
10 Chapter II
11 Chapter III
12 Chapter IV
13 Chapter V
14 Chapter VI
15 Chapter VII
16 Chapter VIII
17 Chapter IX
18 Chapter I
19 Chapter II
20 Chapter III
21 Chapter IV
22 Chapter V
23 Chapter VI

Click on the image for a better look.

To Kill a Mockingbird

From Wikipedia:

To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize, and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author’s observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator’s father, Atticus Finch, has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel’s impact by writing, “In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist, Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism.”[1]

The novel has 31 chapters and you can click on the image to the left for a closer look.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

 

From Wikipedia:

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis. Published in 1950 and set circa 1940, it is the first-published book of The Chronicles of Narnia and is the best known book of the series. Although it was written and published first, it is second in the series’ internal chronological order, after The Magician’s Nephew. Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1] It has also been published in 47 foreign languages.[2]

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-17 and you can click the image for a better look.

New Moon

New Moon is a fantasy novel by author Stephenie Meyer, and is the second novel in the Twilight series. According to Meyer, the book is about losing true love.[1] The title refers to the darkest phase of the lunar cycle, indicating that New Moon is about the darkest time of protagonist Bella Swan’s life.[2] The book was originally released in hardcover in 2006, following the successful publishing of Meyer’s debut novel Twilight. A film adaptation was released on November 20, 2009.[3]

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-20 and you can click the image for a better look.

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on 16 July 2005, is the sixth of seven novels from British author J. K. Rowling‘s popular Harry Potter series. Set during Harry Potter’s sixth year at Hogwarts, the novel explores Lord Voldemort’s past, and Harry’s preparations for the final battle amidst emerging romantic relationships and the emotional confusions and conflict resolutions characteristic of mid-adolescence.

The chapters are helpfully numbered 1-30 and you can click the image for a better look.

Lord of the Rings: full structure.

Okay, so we’ve looked at the first, second and third parts so now we’re going to look at the whole thing.

I’ve taken more from Wikipedia than I normally do because it’s useful to illustrate the point:

The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy novel written by philologist and University of Oxford professor J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien’s earlier, less complex children’s fantasy novel The Hobbit (1937), but eventually developed into a much larger work. It was written in stages between 1937 and 1949, much of it during the Second World War.[1]Although known to most readers as a trilogy, the work was initially intended by Tolkien to be one volume of a two-volume set, with the other being The Silmarillion.[2][3] However, when Tolkien submitted the first volume entitled The Lord of the Rings to his publisher, it was decided for economic reasons to publish the work as three separate volumes, each consisting of two books, over the course of a year in 1954–55, creating the now familiar Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Anyway….  The novel is split into  The Fellowship of the Ring (sections 1-22),  The Two Towers (sections – 23 – 43), and The Return of the King (sections 44-62).  You can, of course see a larger version by clicking on the image, but it should be pretty obvious that the book divisions are fairly arbitrary.