Lower case i and how children are happily changing the language….

  …A little while ago I was running a TooManyCooks camp (it would be a whitewaterwriters camp these days) for year 9 students in a school in South London. On the tuesday evening I looked through the drafts (teachers generally do this too) to give some feedback in the morning. So on the Wednesday morning I mention to the writers they have got a lot of lower-case ‘i’s when they should have capital ones.  They vaguely nod and we move on. That lunchtime, I look…

The list of UK politicians most likely to be making up facts.

This article ranks UK politicians by how likely they are to back up their factual assertions with references. I use their Twitter streams as a starting point.  The method is somewhat noisey and it’s certainly not the sort of thing that I’d call science, but it illustrates some points nicely. As soon as someone comes up with a better method I’ll use that instead. This is a very rough first attempt –  I’ll iterate it a few times (my disability blog list was iterated five…

Friday Requiem: If you would like to clean up the internet, do it properly.

Quick note for readers.  I think it’s important that I consider my back catalogue of posts to be part of the site and that they get maintained, looked after and followed up on.  So each Friday I’ll be picking a post I did from that week last year, and see if my opinions have changed, or find out how the story develops. So last year I wrote this: I used to work for a forensics analysis company, processing hard drives of people that the police…

Presenting CommuniKate 20!

Nine months ago I started working with Kate McCallum on a project that was pretty important to both of us. You will remember Kate from showing us how to hack a switch and from giving us a guide to creating a tactile overlay. Some years ago Kate built a page-set called CommuniKate for her little brother. Fifteen years of AAC experience later this page-set has been used by people with a wide range of needs and on a diverse array of devices. In January this…

Friday Requiem: Book recommendation: Tricks of the mind

Quick note for readers.  I think it’s important that I consider my back catalogue of posts to be part of the site and that they get maintained, looked after and followed up on.  So each Friday I’ll be picking a post I did from that week last year, and see if my opinions have changed, or find out how the story develops. The last few of these Friday Requiem posts have been updates on issues. In this case I’m rewriting a post from this version,…

Importing Oyster Card records into Google Calendar

This is a code post – I’m sharing some code I wrote for importing Oyster card information into Google calendar in case other people might enjoy it.  The github is here.     As I’ve posted about before in various places, I’ve got an interest in self-tracking.  I think that humans are adept at telling themselves lies about their lives and data is a good way of finding out the truth about yourself.  I’d like to think I strive to be a better person, and…

MPs with constituencies that undersupply AAC

So we are all familiar with Stephen Hawking and the machine that allows him to speak.  What you may not know is that there almost 21,000 people in the UK alone who need such a machine – commonly known as Augmentative and Alternative Communication  (AAC) devices.  And the main reason they don’t have one is cost.  Much of the time they are dependent on the heath services to even speak. In 2012 I made freedom of information requests to every Primary Care Trust  (as they…